Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

The articles that are marked with an asterisk(*) indicates that the content is no longer available online.

Title Source Date
Military Use Supplements for Strength, Slimming, Sleep Natural Products INSIDER 13 July 2012

Almost half of U.S. military personnel use dietary supplements, and many of them are seeking bodybuilding, weight loss and sleep benefits, according to a recent survey of more than 100,000 members of U.S. forces.

Combat Exposure Tied to Chronic High Blood Pressure MedPage Today 14 September 2009

U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan who go into combat are more likely to develop high blood pressure over the long term than those who serve in supporting roles, a new military study finds.

Also reported at RedOrbit.com
Also reported at PHYSORG.com
Study Links Deployment to Hypertension Health.mil 15 December 2009

DoD medical researchers have found that service members who suffered multiple combat exposures during a deployment, and especially those who had witnessed death as a result of war, were much more likely to report hypertension (chronic high blood pressure) compared to those who had not seen combat.

Inadequate Sleep May in Itself Up Odds of Diabetes Onset Medscape News Today 15 July 2013

Troubled sleep, short sleep, and sleep apnea predicted the onset of type 2 diabetes, independent of mental-health disorders, in a prospective study of young, healthy military personnel.

Poor Health Linked to PTSD Risk Among Vets Forbes.com 16 April 2009

Military personnel who have poor mental or physical health before they go into combat are more likely to experience post-traumatic stress disorder following their battlefield experience, a U.S. military study finds ...

Combat Deployment Just One Factor That May Cause Smoking U.S. News & World Report 16 April 2015

Combat experience is one of the factors that increases the risk that U.S. soldiers will start smoking, a new study suggests.Researchers analyzed data from a long-term study to assess the long-term health effects of service in the U.S. military. The study began in 2001 and will continue until 2022. The researchers collect survey data every three years.The focus of this study was military personnel who had never smoked or had quit smoking. The researchers wanted to tease out possible factors for either starting or resuming smoking.They found that factors linked to resuming or newly starting a smoking habit included pay grade, service branch, combat deployment, mental health history, stress and individual characteristics.

Health Status Influences PTSD Risk in Veterans MedPage Today 17 April 2009

The risk of combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) increased by two- to threefold in military personnel who had significant mental or physical problems before deployment, according to a study of 5,400 veterans ...

Experts Debate Link Between Deployment And Suicide Risk Forbes.com 19 December 2013

There is a very interesting debate over combat deployment and suicide risk in the December 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.The conversation unfolds in the letters section, and it addresses the results of a JAMA study published in August that suggested military deployment is not associated with suicide risk.

Pentagon study links prescription stimulants to military PTSD risk Los Angeles Times 19 November 2015

Stimulant medications used to treat attention deficit problems and keep service members alert during long stretches of combat might increase vulnerability to post-traumatic stress disorder.

Also reported at:
(e) Science News
Poor Physical, Mental Health Status May Increase PTSD Risk Medscape 20 April 2009

Poor physical or mental health prior to combat exposure may predispose military personnel to an increased risk for new-onset posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after deployment, new research suggests ...

The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense of non-U.S. Government sites or the information, products, or services contained therein. Although the Department of Defense may or may not use these sites as additional distribution channels for Department of Defense information, it does not exercise editorial control over all of the information that you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this website.