Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

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Title Source Date
Combat Deployment Just One Factor That May Cause Smoking U.S. News & World Report 16 April 2015

Combat experience is one of the factors that increases the risk that U.S. soldiers will start smoking, a new study suggests.Researchers analyzed data from a long-term study to assess the long-term health effects of service in the U.S. military. The study began in 2001 and will continue until 2022. The researchers collect survey data every three years.The focus of this study was military personnel who had never smoked or had quit smoking. The researchers wanted to tease out possible factors for either starting or resuming smoking.They found that factors linked to resuming or newly starting a smoking habit included pay grade, service branch, combat deployment, mental health history, stress and individual characteristics.

Combat Exposure Tied to Chronic High Blood Pressure MedPage Today 14 September 2009

U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan who go into combat are more likely to develop high blood pressure over the long term than those who serve in supporting roles, a new military study finds.

Also reported at RedOrbit.com
Also reported at PHYSORG.com
Deployed service members have higher risks for smoking, heavy drinking, and PTSD Federal Health Institute Newsletter 29 May 2009

A recent study on the long-term health effects of thousands of service members found that deployed service members who are exposed to combat have increased risks for smoking, heavy drinking and PTSD symptoms

Deployment Factors Are Not Related to Rise in Military Suicides New York Times 6 Aug 2013

The record number of military suicides seen in recent years may not be directly due to extended deployments or combat experience, according to a new study. This data analysis, funded by the Department of Defense, suggests that the real reason behind the growing number of military suicides is underlying mental health issues in this population.

DoD study ongoing to investigate Airmen's health Air Force Press News May 27, 2005

SAN ANTONIO - An ongoing Department of Defense health study will ultimately examine health surveys submitted by service members throughout 20 years. The joint-service Millennium Cohort Study will evaluate the health risks ...

DoD study ongoing to investigate Marines' health USMC Press Release June 2, 2005

SAN DIEGO - In response to health events surrounding the 1990-1991 Gulf War, a need was identified to create a long-term study to describe the health affects associated with military service, especially those related to ...

DoD-VA Research Partnership to Improve Understanding of Active Duty and Veteran Health Defense Video Imagery Distribution System 28 March 2017

A new partnership between DoD and VA medical researchers achieves a milestone with its first joint publication, which examines post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in veteran and active duty populations. The study will be published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research, June 2017.

Experts Debate Link Between Deployment And Suicide Risk Forbes.com 19 December 2013

There is a very interesting debate over combat deployment and suicide risk in the December 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.The conversation unfolds in the letters section, and it addresses the results of a JAMA study published in August that suggested military deployment is not associated with suicide risk.

Experts look at how sexual assault impacts male service members Stars and Stripes Okinawa 26 October 2017

Sexual assault within the military continues to receive increasing attention. While sexual assault happens to both men and women in the military, little is known about the impact of sexual assault on men.

Female Soldiers at No Greater Risk than Men for PTSD MSN 25 August 2015

A new study by the Department of Veterans Affairs found there is no difference in the chances of developing post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, between males and females who have similar experiences, combat included.As a result of carefully looking at veterans' medical histories and life experiences, researchers said the number of PTSD cases among veterans caused specifically by service in Iraq and Afghanistan may be lower than thought.

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