Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

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Title Source Date
Pre-Existing Insomnia Linked to PTSD and Other Mental Disorders After Military Deployment Science Daily 28 June 2013<

Pre-Existing Insomnia Linked to PTSD and Other Mental Disorders After Military Deployment Science Daily - 28 June 2013 The new study, published in the July 2013 issue of the journal SLEEP, found that pre-existing insomnia symptoms conferred almost as a large of a risk for those mental disorders as combat exposure.

Pre-existing psychiatric disorders predict post-deployment PTSD regardless of physical injury severity Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Summer 2011

Service members with one or more mental health disorders prior to deployment were two- and-a-half times more likely to screen positive for PTSD post-deployment compared to those with no mental health disorders, after controlling for pre-deployment PTSD, physical injury severity and a host of other risk factors.

Article is on page 2 of the Summer 2011 issue.
Psych Disorders May Predispose Soldiers to PTSD MedPage Today 3 May 2011

For military personnel, having at least one psychiatric disorder before deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan appears to increase the likelihood of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after deployment, the prospective Millennium Cohort Study showed.

PTSD increases risk of developing diabetes Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Fall 2010

A newly published study finds that PTSD symptoms at baseline, but not other mental health symptoms, are significantly associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes among military service members. Increases in the prevalence of PTSD among the military population could have an impact on rates of physical disorders, such as diabetes, in the coming years.

PTSD may raise diabetes risk in service members Reuters 24 May, 2010

Military service members with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more likely to develop diabetes than their counterparts without PTSD symptoms, results of a new study hint. While previous research has suggested that depression increases the risk of diabetes, the new study of more than 44,000 active duty service members suggests another stronger association.

Also reported at MDLinx.com
PTSD symptom trajectories among deployed U.S. military personnel. Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Summer 2012

Analysis of U.S. service members who had deployed either once or multiple times revealed that both groups shared very similar PTSD trajectories over time, with the vast majority (83% single deployers, 85% multiple deployers) displaying a low-stable (resilient) symptom pattern that lasted from pre-deployment to several years post-deployment. The other PTSD symptom trajectory patterns included moderate-improving (8%, 8.5%), worsening-chronic (6.7%, 4.5%), high-stable (2.2% single deployers only) and high-improving (2.2% multiple deployers only).

Article is on page 5 of the Summer 2012 issue
Recruiting for Mental Resilience Needs to be a Priority UT San Diego 27 Oct 2013

Today's all-volunteer force is arguably one of the most highly trained and highly educated in our nation's history. To maintain that edge, it must have a strong recruiting pipeline, one that seeks out physically fit, smart young men and women who are interested in serving their country and gaining valuable skills for subsequent careers outside the military. Why, then, don't they recruit for mental health and resiliency?

Report Examines Readjustment Needs of Veterans and Troops US Medicine 8 April 2013

DoD and VA should sponsor longitudinal studies to answer questions regarding long-term effect of TBI, PTSD and other mental health disorders, a recent IoM report recommended. The report suggested that current studies like the Millennium Cohort Study and the Longitudinal Health Study of the Gulf War Era Veterans may provide a platform for long-term followup.

Respiratory Conditions Investigated for the Deployed US DoD Military Health System 10 February 2010

A recent study published by DoD researchers in the American Journal of Epidemiology reports that service members who deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan are at no increased risk for developing chronic respiratory conditions.

Respiratory Symptoms and Conditions Reported Among Military Personnel Deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan MHS Vital Signs 9 December 2009

A study recently published by researchers at the Naval Health Research Center addresses concerns about respiratory conditions among persons deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

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