Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

The articles that are marked with an asterisk(*) indicates that the content is no longer available online.

Title Source Date
Risk factors for lower extremity tendinopathies in military personnel Healio 01 August 2013

Lower extremity tendinopathies and plantar fasciitis were common injuries among military personnel, with plantar fasciitis incidents significantly associated with deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, according to recent study results

Sexual harassment, assault more likely for deployed women who saw 'combat' Stars and Stripes 30 Sept 2013

Deployed women who underwent "combat-like" experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan are much more likely to report sexual harassment and sexual assault compared with other deployed women, according to a new study.

Also reported at:
Military.com, UPI, MDLinx, Medscape (* log-in required)
Sexual Trauma is Associated with Adverse Outcomes among US Service Women ISTSS Trauma Blog 1 September 2015

This study provides evidence of the negative consequences of sexual trauma to US military women, including decrements in functionality in the workplace and potentially on military readiness. Given the increasing roles and responsibilities of women with the military, prevention and mitigation against sexual trauma should remain a high priority. These data support the urgent need for effective strategies to prevent sexual trauma and provide important information for developing programs to assist women who have experience sexual trauma.

Sleep quality worse during or post-deployment compared to pre-deployment Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Spring 2011

Service members who were currently deployed or had returned from a deployment had significantly shorter adjusted sleep duration and increased adjusted odds of reporting trouble sleeping compared to those who had not deployed.

Article is on page 4 of the Spring 2011 issue.
Sleep Suffers in the Combat Zone LiveScience.com 1 December 2010

Getting a good night's sleep is much more difficult for military personnel who deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, according to a new study of sleep patterns in the military. The scientific research confirms what plenty of soldiers, Marines and other members of the U.S. military have already experienced firsthand.

Also reported at MSN.com
Sleepless Soldiers: Study Suggests That Military Deployment Affects Sleep Patterns American Academy of Sleep Medicine 1 December 2010

A study in the Dec. 1 issue of the journal SLEEP found that deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan significantly influenced sleep quality and quantity in a population of 41,225 military service personnel. The study suggests that the promotion of healthier sleep patterns may be beneficial for military service members.

Also reported at Science Daily website
Also reported at Physorg.com
Study Endorsed by Army's Top Doc Navy.mil 1 October 2014

The Department of Defense's largest longitudinal study in military history received an endorsement from the Army's surgeon general Sept. 19, emphasizing the importance of the Navy-led study across the military services.

Study Finds Scant Data on Illnesses of Troops New York Times 1 November 2011

Study findings indicate that there is insufficient data to conclude that dust and pollution in the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan, particularly from the burn pits used by the military to incinerate garbage, could cause long-term health problems in troops.

A version of this article appeared in print on 1 November 2011, on page A17 of the New York edition with the headline: Study Finds Scant Data On Illnesses Of Troops.
Study Links Deployment to Hypertension Health.mil 15 December 2009

DoD medical researchers have found that service members who suffered multiple combat exposures during a deployment, and especially those who had witnessed death as a result of war, were much more likely to report hypertension (chronic high blood pressure) compared to those who had not seen combat.

Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity News Medical 27 June 2016

Despite being held to stringent weight and body fat standards, newly published research shows that one in five individuals from a sample of U.S. military personnel from 2001 - 2008 have obesity. Further, shortly after separating from active duty, U.S. military veterans are as likely to have obesity as civilians. Data from the research also showed an association between military personnel who have obesity - including both active duty and veterans - and mental health conditions like depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The research led by Toni Rush, MPH, is published in the July issue of Obesity, the scientific journal of The Obesity Society.

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