Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

The articles that are marked with an asterisk(*) indicates that the content is no longer available online.

Title Source Date
Risk factors for lower extremity tendinopathies in military personnel Healio 01 August 2013

Lower extremity tendinopathies and plantar fasciitis were common injuries among military personnel, with plantar fasciitis incidents significantly associated with deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, according to recent study results

Sleepless Soldiers: Study Suggests That Military Deployment Affects Sleep Patterns American Academy of Sleep Medicine 1 December 2010

A study in the Dec. 1 issue of the journal SLEEP found that deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan significantly influenced sleep quality and quantity in a population of 41,225 military service personnel. The study suggests that the promotion of healthier sleep patterns may be beneficial for military service members.

Also reported at Science Daily website
Also reported at Physorg.com
Military Deployment May Lead to Unhealthy Sleep Patterns Health.com 1 December 2010

Deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan significantly affects the quality and quantity of sleep of many U.S. military personnel, new research indicates.

Also reported at HealthDay.com
Sleep Suffers in the Combat Zone LiveScience.com 1 December 2010

Getting a good night's sleep is much more difficult for military personnel who deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, according to a new study of sleep patterns in the military. The scientific research confirms what plenty of soldiers, Marines and other members of the U.S. military have already experienced firsthand.

Also reported at MSN.com
Study Finds Scant Data on Illnesses of Troops New York Times 1 November 2011

Study findings indicate that there is insufficient data to conclude that dust and pollution in the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan, particularly from the burn pits used by the military to incinerate garbage, could cause long-term health problems in troops.

A version of this article appeared in print on 1 November 2011, on page A17 of the New York edition with the headline: Study Finds Scant Data On Illnesses Of Troops.
Study Endorsed by Army's Top Doc Navy.mil 1 October 2014

The Department of Defense's largest longitudinal study in military history received an endorsement from the Army's surgeon general Sept. 19, emphasizing the importance of the Navy-led study across the military services.

Sexual Trauma is Associated with Adverse Outcomes among US Service Women ISTSS Trauma Blog 1 September 2015

This study provides evidence of the negative consequences of sexual trauma to US military women, including decrements in functionality in the workplace and potentially on military readiness. Given the increasing roles and responsibilities of women with the military, prevention and mitigation against sexual trauma should remain a high priority. These data support the urgent need for effective strategies to prevent sexual trauma and provide important information for developing programs to assist women who have experience sexual trauma.

Respiratory Conditions Investigated for the Deployed US DoD Military Health System 10 February 2010

A recent study published by DoD researchers in the American Journal of Epidemiology reports that service members who deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan are at no increased risk for developing chronic respiratory conditions.

Forty Percent of Military Population Uses Alternative Therapies US Department of Defense Military Health System 11 August 2009

The Naval Health Research Center recently published an article in the Annals of Epidemiology on the use of complementary and alternative medicine in the military population. The article found that approximately forty percent of the U.S. military population uses alternative therapies.

Story shared in the Health Information Operations Weekly Update Newsletter by the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine dated 21 August 2009.
Giving Birth after Battle: Increased Risk of Postpartum Depression for Women in Military Science & Sensibility 11 November 2013

Today, November 11th is Veteran's Day in the United States and Americans honor those who have served and continue to serve in the Armed Forces in order to protect our country. Today on Science & Sensibility, regular contributor Walker Karraa, PhD, takes a look at the impact serving in battle has on women who go on to birth. In an exclusive interview with expert Cynthia LeardMann, Walker shares with S&S readers what the study says and receives more indepth information that provides additional insight into just what women in the military face in regards to their increased risk of PPMADs.

The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense of non-U.S. Government sites or the information, products, or services contained therein. Although the Department of Defense may or may not use these sites as additional distribution channels for Department of Defense information, it does not exercise editorial control over all of the information that you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this website.