Publications

The following manuscripts have been published or are currently in press. Listings are in chronological order, unless otherwise noted.

Title Publication Date/Location
Risk factors for lower extremity tendinopathies in military personnel The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine 2013 Jan-Jun;1(1) 2325967113492707

Owens BD, Wolf JM, Seelig AD, Jacobson IG, Boyko EJ, Smith B, Ryan MAK, Gackstetter GD, Smith TC

This study found that deployment was associated with the development of plantar fasciitis. Modifiable risk factors including being overweight or obese were associated with both Achilles tendinopathy and plantar fasciitis, with a marginal relationship between moderate alcohol use and Achilles tendinopathy. Identification of potential risk factors for musculoskeletal injuries among service members could serve as the focus for future prevention and intervention efforts.

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Is Military Deployment a Risk Factor for Maternal Depression? Journal of Women's Health 2013 Jan; 22(1):9-18

Nguyen S, LeardMann CA, Smith B, Conlin AMS, Slymen DJ, Hooper TI, Ryan MAK, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

This study found that military women who recently gave birth and then deployed with combat experience had an increased risk for depression. Combat experience primarily increased the risk for depression, rather than childbirth itself. In addition, deployment without combat experience was not significantly associated with maternal depression among women who recently gave birth.

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Posttraumatic stress disorder and depression among US military health care professionals deployed in support of the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan Journal of Traumatic Stress 2012 Dec;25(6):616-23

Jacobson IG, Horton JL, LeardMann CA, Ryan MAK, Boyko EJ, Wells TS, Smith B, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Among military personnel deployed with combat experience, health care professionals did not have increased odds for new-onset PTSD or depression over time compared to individuals in other occupations. Combat experience significantly increased the odds for new-onset PTSD or depression among deployed health care professionals, suggesting that combat experience, not features specific to being a health care professional, was the key exposure explaining development of these outcomes.

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Profile of two cohorts: UK and US prospective studies of military health International Journal of Epidemiology 2012 Oct;41(5):1272-82

Pinder RJ, Greenberg N, Boyko EJ, Gackstetter GD, Hooper TI, Murphy D, Ryan MA, Smith B, Smith TC, Wells TS, Wessely S, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Despite differences and limitations in methodologies, analyses of these two cohorts provide the prospect of driving improvement and innovation in military health and extending findings to other occupational populations.

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Prospective evaluation of mental health and deployment experience among women in the US military American Journal of Epidemiology 2012;176(2):135-45

Seelig AD, Jacobson IG, Smith B, Hooper TI, Gackstetter GG, Ryan MAK, Wells TS, MacDermid Wadsworth S, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Women with reported combat exposures were more likely to have mental health symptoms than women who deployed without combat associated exposures and women who never deployed.

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Body building, energy, and weight loss supplements are associated with deployment and physical activity in U.S. Military personnel Annals of Epidemiology 2012;22:318-330

Jacobson IG, Horton JL, Smith B, Wells TS, Boyko EJ, Lieberman HR, Ryan MAK, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Nearly half of the population studied reported use of energy, body building, or weight loss supplements, with energy supplements being the most highly endorsed (38%) supplement type. Deployment experience, physical activity, problem drinking, and suboptimal sleep emerged as important characteristics associated with supplement use, which may be of importance to medical planners and military policy makers in targeting adverse event monitoring and for future research determining how supplements affect performance and health over time.

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Prospective assessment of chronic multisymptom illness reporting possibly associated with open-Air burn pit smoke exposure in Iraq Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2012 June;54(6):682-688

Powell TM, Smith TC, Jacobson IG, Boyko EJ, Hooper TI, Gackstetter GD, Phillips CJ, Smith B, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

There was no increase in chronic multisymptom illness (CMI) symptom reporting in Army and Air Force personnel deployed within a 2-, 3-, or5-mile radius of documented open-air burn pits located in Iraq at Joint Base Balad, Camp Taji, and Camp Speicher compared with other deployed personnel. This initial report on possible burn pit exposure associated with CMI at apopulation-level is reassuring, but future research evaluating the potential association of burn pit smoke and CMI should utilize individual exposure data when possible.

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Newly reported lupus and rheumatoid arthritis in relation to deployment within proximity to a documented open-air burn pit in Iraq Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2012 June;54(6):698-707

Jones KA, Smith B, Granado NS, Boyko EJ, Gackstetter GD, Ryan MAK, Phillips CJ, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

This study examined the incidence lupus and rheumatoid arthritis in relation to Army and Air Force personnel deployed within a 3- and 5-mile radius of documented open-air burn pits located in Iraq at Joint Base Balad, Camp Speicher, and Camp Taji. Overall, the results indicate no elevated risk of newly reported lupus or rheumatoid arthritis in the combined three-camp analysis. However, possible exposure at Balad was individually associated with newly reported lupus, although only two cases were at this site. Additional studies, including individual exposure data, are needed to further investigate these associations.

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The effects of exposure to documented open-air burn pits on respiratory health among deployers of the Millennium Cohort Study Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2012 June;54(6):708-716

Smith B, Wong CA, Boyko EJ, Phillips CJ, Gackstetter GD, Ryan MAK, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Burn pit exposure within 3 or 5 miles was not associated with newly reported asthma, chronic bronchitis or emphysema, or self-reported respiratory symptoms. In general, these findings do not support an elevated risk for respiratory outcomes among personnel deployed within proximity of documented burn pits in Iraq. Increased symptom reporting, however, was observed among Air Force deployers located within 2 miles of Joint Base Balad, though this finding was marginally significant with no evidence of trend.

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Individual augmentee deployment and newly reported mental health morbidity Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2012 May;54(5):615-620

Granado NS, Zimmermann L, Smith B, Jones KA, Wells TS, Ryan MAK, Slymen DL, Koffman RL, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Individual augmentees (IAs), who presumably have lower social support or unit cohesion, were not at increased risk for PTSD or mental health symptoms following deployment compared with non-IA deployers. It is likely that social isolation was not highly influential among Navy IAs in this study.

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