Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

The articles that are marked with an asterisk(*) indicates that the content is no longer available online.

Title Source Date
Female Soldiers at No Greater Risk than Men for PTSD MSN 25 August 2015

A new study by the Department of Veterans Affairs found there is no difference in the chances of developing post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, between males and females who have similar experiences, combat included.As a result of carefully looking at veterans' medical histories and life experiences, researchers said the number of PTSD cases among veterans caused specifically by service in Iraq and Afghanistan may be lower than thought.

Forty Percent of Military Population Uses Alternative Therapies US Department of Defense Military Health System 11 August 2009

The Naval Health Research Center recently published an article in the Annals of Epidemiology on the use of complementary and alternative medicine in the military population. The article found that approximately forty percent of the U.S. military population uses alternative therapies.

Story shared in the Health Information Operations Weekly Update Newsletter by the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine dated 21 August 2009.
Giving Birth after Battle: Increased Risk of Postpartum Depression for Women in Military Science & Sensibility 11 November 2013

Today, November 11th is Veteran's Day in the United States and Americans honor those who have served and continue to serve in the Armed Forces in order to protect our country. Today on Science & Sensibility, regular contributor Walker Karraa, PhD, takes a look at the impact serving in battle has on women who go on to birth. In an exclusive interview with expert Cynthia LeardMann, Walker shares with S&S readers what the study says and receives more indepth information that provides additional insight into just what women in the military face in regards to their increased risk of PPMADs.

Health Status Influences PTSD Risk in Veterans MedPage Today 17 April 2009

The risk of combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) increased by two- to threefold in military personnel who had significant mental or physical problems before deployment, according to a study of 5,400 veterans ...

Health Study Uses Data from Global War on Terrorism DefenseLink.mil News Article May 29, 2007

When a landmark Defense Department-sponsored health study was launched six years ago, one of its goals was to evaluate the impact of future deployments on long-term health. The investigators did not know how timely the project would be...

Story shared in the Association of Military Surgeons United States (AMSUS) The Society of the Federal Health Agencies Newsletter dated Summer 2007
Inadequate Sleep May in Itself Up Odds of Diabetes Onset Medscape News Today 15 July 2013

Troubled sleep, short sleep, and sleep apnea predicted the onset of type 2 diabetes, independent of mental-health disorders, in a prospective study of young, healthy military personnel.

Increased physical activity levels linked to reduced PTSD symptoms Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Summer 2011

Participants who engaged in less physical activity were more likely to screen positive for PTSD. Those who reported at least 20 minutes of vigorous activity twice a week had significantly reduced odds for new-onset and persistent PTSD symptoms.

Article is on page 4 of the Summer 2011 issue.
Individual augmentees do not report increased mental health symptoms. Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Summer 2012

Deployment as a Navy individual augmentee (IA) was not significantly associated with newly reported PTSD or symptoms of mental health problems (including PTSD, depression, panic or other anxiety and alcohol-related problems) compared with non-IA deployment.

Article is on page 3 of the Summer 2012 issue
Insomnia and poor sleep duration pre-deployment are associated with development of PTSD, anxiety and depression after first deployment Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly 30 April 2014

Among service members with no history of mental disorder diagnosis or psychotropic medication prescription, and who screened negative for depression, anxiety, PTSD and panic pre-deployment, 3.4% developed PTSD, less than 1% developed anxiety and less than 2% developed depression after first deployment. Service members who reported sleeping fewer than six hours per night pre-deployment were significantly more likely to develop PTSD than those sleeping seven hours per night. Additionally, those reporting insomnia symptoms pre-deployment were at higher risk for new-onset PTSD, anxiety and depression.

Iraq/Afghanistan deployment tied to respiratory woes Global News 3 December 2009

U.S. military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan face an increased risk for developing respiratory symptoms, including persistent or recurring cough and shortness of breath, a large-scale military study has shown.

The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense of non-U.S. Government sites or the information, products, or services contained therein. Although the Department of Defense may or may not use these sites as additional distribution channels for Department of Defense information, it does not exercise editorial control over all of the information that you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this website.