Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

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Title Source Date
Increased physical activity levels linked to reduced PTSD symptoms Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Summer 2011

Participants who engaged in less physical activity were more likely to screen positive for PTSD. Those who reported at least 20 minutes of vigorous activity twice a week had significantly reduced odds for new-onset and persistent PTSD symptoms.

Article is on page 4 of the Summer 2011 issue.
Pre-existing psychiatric disorders predict post-deployment PTSD regardless of physical injury severity Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Summer 2011

Service members with one or more mental health disorders prior to deployment were two- and-a-half times more likely to screen positive for PTSD post-deployment compared to those with no mental health disorders, after controlling for pre-deployment PTSD, physical injury severity and a host of other risk factors.

Article is on page 2 of the Summer 2011 issue.
Psych Disorders May Predispose Soldiers to PTSD MedPage Today 3 May 2011

For military personnel, having at least one psychiatric disorder before deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan appears to increase the likelihood of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after deployment, the prospective Millennium Cohort Study showed.

Military Personnel With Mental Woes Before Deployment at Higher PTSD Risk Health Day 3 May 2011

Military personnel who have a psychiatric disorder prior to deployment or who've been injured during combat are more likely to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after they return home.

Sleep quality worse during or post-deployment compared to pre-deployment Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Spring 2011

Service members who were currently deployed or had returned from a deployment had significantly shorter adjusted sleep duration and increased adjusted odds of reporting trouble sleeping compared to those who had not deployed.

Article is on page 4 of the Spring 2011 issue.
Trying to Get Rest For The Weary: Managing Sleep Disorders In Returning Servicemembers US Medicine 2011 April

Returning servicemembers are among the some 40 million Americans who suffer from chronic long term sleep disorders, and, for reasons ranging from disrupted sleep during deployment

PTSD increases risk of developing diabetes Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Fall 2010

A newly published study finds that PTSD symptoms at baseline, but not other mental health symptoms, are significantly associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes among military service members. Increases in the prevalence of PTSD among the military population could have an impact on rates of physical disorders, such as diabetes, in the coming years.

Sleep Suffers in the Combat Zone LiveScience.com 1 December 2010

Getting a good night's sleep is much more difficult for military personnel who deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, according to a new study of sleep patterns in the military. The scientific research confirms what plenty of soldiers, Marines and other members of the U.S. military have already experienced firsthand.

Also reported at MSN.com
Military Deployment May Lead to Unhealthy Sleep Patterns Health.com 1 December 2010

Deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan significantly affects the quality and quantity of sleep of many U.S. military personnel, new research indicates.

Also reported at HealthDay.com
Sleepless Soldiers: Study Suggests That Military Deployment Affects Sleep Patterns American Academy of Sleep Medicine 1 December 2010

A study in the Dec. 1 issue of the journal SLEEP found that deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan significantly influenced sleep quality and quantity in a population of 41,225 military service personnel. The study suggests that the promotion of healthier sleep patterns may be beneficial for military service members.

Also reported at Science Daily website
Also reported at Physorg.com

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