Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

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Title Source Date
Millennium Cohort Study Expanding To Include Spouses of Service Members Force Health Protection and Readiness 22 March 2010

The Millennium Cohort Study, which was launched in 2001 to help address health outcomes related to Service members' deployments, will soon be increasing its enrollment to more than 200,000 participants. The next survey cycle, which begins this year, will add 50,000 new Cohort members plus 10,000 spouses of Service members to the study.

Poor Health Linked to PTSD Risk Among Vets Forbes.com 16 April 2009

Military personnel who have poor mental or physical health before they go into combat are more likely to experience post-traumatic stress disorder following their battlefield experience, a U.S. military study finds ...

Experts Debate Link Between Deployment And Suicide Risk Forbes.com 19 December 2013

There is a very interesting debate over combat deployment and suicide risk in the December 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.The conversation unfolds in the letters section, and it addresses the results of a JAMA study published in August that suggested military deployment is not associated with suicide risk.

Deployed service members have higher risks for smoking, heavy drinking, and PTSD Federal Health Institute Newsletter 29 May 2009

A recent study on the long-term health effects of thousands of service members found that deployed service members who are exposed to combat have increased risks for smoking, heavy drinking and PTSD symptoms

Health Study Uses Data from Global War on Terrorism DefenseLink.mil News Article May 29, 2007

When a landmark Defense Department-sponsored health study was launched six years ago, one of its goals was to evaluate the impact of future deployments on long-term health. The investigators did not know how timely the project would be...

Story shared in the Association of Military Surgeons United States (AMSUS) The Society of the Federal Health Agencies Newsletter dated Summer 2007
Study Spurs Reassessment of Alcohol Awareness Programs DefenseLink.mil August 13, 2008

WASHINGTON, Aug. 13, 2008 - Defense Department officials are assessing ways to better prepare servicemembers, particularly members of the reserve and National Guard, for the stresses of combat so they're better able to avoid alcohol-related problems when they return home, defense officials said today ...

Millennium Cohort Study Examines Self-Reported Back Pain and Combat Deployment Defense Video Imagery Distribution System 5 December 2016

Recent research from the Millennium Cohort Study found that military personnel who deployed with combat experiences were more likely to report back pain after deployment than service members who deployed without combat experience. Study findings were recently published in the November issue of Spine.

DoD-VA Research Partnership to Improve Understanding of Active Duty and Veteran Health Defense Video Imagery Distribution System 28 March 2017

A new partnership between DoD and VA medical researchers achieves a milestone with its first joint publication, which examines post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in veteran and active duty populations. The study will be published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research, June 2017.

PTSD increases risk of developing diabetes Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Fall 2010

A newly published study finds that PTSD symptoms at baseline, but not other mental health symptoms, are significantly associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes among military service members. Increases in the prevalence of PTSD among the military population could have an impact on rates of physical disorders, such as diabetes, in the coming years.

Sleep quality worse during or post-deployment compared to pre-deployment Combat and Operational Stress Research Quarterly Spring 2011

Service members who were currently deployed or had returned from a deployment had significantly shorter adjusted sleep duration and increased adjusted odds of reporting trouble sleeping compared to those who had not deployed.

Article is on page 4 of the Spring 2011 issue.

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