Press Coverage

The Millennium Cohort Study has been well-covered in the press. Please be patient, as these links will be opened in a new window.

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Title Source Date
Combat Exposure Tied to Chronic High Blood Pressure MedPage Today 14 September 2009

U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan who go into combat are more likely to develop high blood pressure over the long term than those who serve in supporting roles, a new military study finds.

Also reported at RedOrbit.com
Also reported at PHYSORG.com
Combat Deployment Just One Factor That May Cause Smoking U.S. News & World Report 16 April 2015

Combat experience is one of the factors that increases the risk that U.S. soldiers will start smoking, a new study suggests.Researchers analyzed data from a long-term study to assess the long-term health effects of service in the U.S. military. The study began in 2001 and will continue until 2022. The researchers collect survey data every three years.The focus of this study was military personnel who had never smoked or had quit smoking. The researchers wanted to tease out possible factors for either starting or resuming smoking.They found that factors linked to resuming or newly starting a smoking habit included pay grade, service branch, combat deployment, mental health history, stress and individual characteristics.

Cause and Effect: The Millennium Cohort Study focuses on the long-term health-care consequences of deployment The American Legion Magazine October 2010

Since 2001, the Department of Defense has been conducting a large-scale, long-term study of military personnel and veterans to help close the information gap. The Millennium Cohort Study randomly selected the first of what were eventually about 150,000 participants from all service branches, the National Guard and the reserves, asking them to answer health-related questionnaires once every three years over a span of 21 years.

Bringing Military Medicine Into Clearer Focus Advance for Respiratory Care & Sleep Medicine 5 April 2010

The "Advance for Respiratory Care & Sleep Medicine" publication covers some cutting edge military medicine research that is currently ongoing. Highlighted in this article is the Millennium Cohort Study's contributions to U.S. military's epidemiological efforts.

As burn pit registry grows, VA expands research into related lung disease U.S. Medicine 15 July 2018

VA and DoD are working together and in partnership with various private institutions on studies regarding possible adverse health effects related to exposure to open-air burn pits.

Are you one of these 200,000 taking part in a military and veteran health study? DoD wants your input Military Times 21 November 2019

If you’re among the more than 200,000 service members and veterans participating in the long-term health study, researchers are calling on you to fill out a follow-up survey, as they track health risks of deployment, military occupations and general military service.

Alcohol and returning troops ABC2News.com August 13, 2008

Baltimore's ABC2News.com reports that as U.S. troops return from war, a new study finds some may experience serious problems with alcohol ...

Alcohol a problem for stressed returning soldiers USA Today August 12, 2008

CHICAGO (AP) - National Guard and Reserve combat troops in Iraq and Afghanistan are more likely to develop drinking problems than active-duty U.S. soldiers, a new military study suggests ...

Air Force Portal announces approach of 2007 survey Air Force Portal February 27, 2007

The online portal run by the United States Air Force recently posted an announcement acknowledging the approach of the Millennium Cohort Study's 2007 Survey Effort. Because this announcement is behind a password-protected site, the link provided above will open a window with a snapshot of the Air Force Portal's posting ...

After combat, soldiers turning to alcohol NBCNews.com August 12, 2008

CHICAGO - National Guard and Reserve combat troops in Iraq and Afghanistan are more likely to develop drinking problems than active-duty soldiers, a new military study suggests ...

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