Publications

The following manuscripts have been published or are currently in press. Listings are in chronological order, unless otherwise noted.

Research Publication 2
Title Publication Date/Location
A Comparison of Mental Health Outcomes in Persons Entering US Military Service Before and After September 11, 2001 Journal of Traumatic Stress 2012 Feb;25: 17-24

Wells TS, Ryan MAK, Jones KA, Hooper TI, Boyko EJ, Jacobson IG, Smith TC, Gackstetter GD, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

It is hypothesized that those who entered military service prior to September 11, 2001 might have had expectations of experiencing a regular operational tempo and less combat compared with those entering service after this date, therefore an increased risk for mental disorders. Although measuring the direct reason for entering the military was not possible for this study, the findings showed that those entering pre-September 11 did not have a higher odds of mental disorders, suggesting that mental disorders resulting from the experience of war are common across the pre- and post-September 11 accession eras.

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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression Among US Military Health Care Professionals Deployed in Support of the Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan Journal of Traumatic Stress 2012 Dec;25(6):616-23

Jacobson IG, Horton JL, LeardMann CA, Ryan MAK, Boyko EJ, Wells TS, Smith B, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Among military personnel deployed with combat experience, health care professionals did not have increased odds for new-onset PTSD or depression over time compared to individuals in other occupations. Combat experience significantly increased the odds for new-onset PTSD or depression among deployed health care professionals, suggesting that combat experience, not features specific to being a health care professional, was the key exposure explaining development of these outcomes.

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Is Military Deployment a Risk Factor for Maternal Depression? Journal of Women's Health 2013 Jan; 22(1):9-18

Nguyen S, LeardMann CA, Smith B, Conlin AMS, Slymen DJ, Hooper TI, Ryan MAK, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

This study found that military women who recently gave birth and then deployed with combat experience had an increased risk for depression. Combat experience primarily increased the risk for depression, rather than childbirth itself. In addition, deployment without combat experience was not significantly associated with maternal depression among women who recently gave birth.

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US Naval and Marine Corps Occupations, PTSD and Depression Risk and Absenteeism Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health 2014;29(2):91–112

Wells TS, Bagnell ME, Miller SC, Smith TC, Gackstetter GD and Boyko EJ for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

This study investigated whether military occupation was associated with PTSD or depression, and if PTSD or depression was associated with lost workdays among US Navy and US Marine personnel. Navy personnel in service and supply occupations were 85% more likely to screen positive for new-onset PTSD, while those serving in health care were 58% more likely to screen positive for new-onset depression compared to other occupations. In addition, those with new-onset and persistent PTSD were twice as likely to miss one or more days of work. This suggests that early identification and management of these conditions may improve force readiness.

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The Millennium Cohort Study: Answering Long-Term Health Concerns of US Military Service Members by Integrating Longitudinal Survey Data with Military Health System Records Military Health Care From predeployment to post-separation 1st ed. New York, NY: Routledge;2013: 55-77

Crum-Cianflone N

In: Amara J, Hendricks A, eds

This textbook chapter provides a detailed summary of the first decade of the Millennium Cohort Study. The chapter includes an overview of the study methodology and key publications including a review of foundational papers and epidemiologic studies examining the associations of military service experiences with mental, behavioral, and physical health outcomes.
Mental Health and Comorbidities in U.S. Military Members Military Medicine 2016 June;181(6):537-45

Crum-Cianflone NF, Powell TM, LeardMann CA, Russell DR, Boyko EJ

This study examined incidence rates of mental and behavioral disorders using self-reported and electronic medical record data from US Servicemembers who joined the military after September 11th, 2001. Combat deployers had the highest incidence rates of PTSD, panic/anxiety disorder, and any mental disorder. Of those with recent PTSD, 73% concurrently developed at least one other incident mental or behavioral conditions. Most diagnoses were not represented in the medical records. Findings indicate the high burden of these conditions that are greatly underestimated using medical data alone, demonstrating the value of survey data and screening tools among this population.

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The Millennium Cohort Study: A 21-Year Prospective Cohort Study of 140,000 Military Personnel Military Medicine 2002 Jun;167(6):483-8.

Gray GC, Chesbrough KB, Ryan MAK, Amoroso P, Boyko EJ, Gackstetter GD, Hooper TI, Riddle JR, for the Millennium Cohort Study Group

The origins and development of the Millennium Cohort Study are described. The largest prospective study in military history was established to answer the most difficult questions about long-term health after military service.

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Linking Exposures and Health Outcomes to a Large Population-Based Longitudinal Study: the Millennium Cohort Study Military Medicine 2011 Jul;176(7 Suppl):56-63

Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Linking Millennium Cohort prospective data to individual-level exposure data is critical for understanding and quantifying any long-term health outcomes potentially associated with unique military occupational exposures.

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A Longitudinal Comparison of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression Among Military Service Components Military Psychology 2014;26(2): 77–87

Schaller EK, Woodall KA, Lemus H, Proctor SP, Russell DW, Crum-Cianflone NF

This study investigated PTSD and depression between Reserve, National Guard and active duty continuously and dichotomously, while adjusting for deployment-related characteristics and other relevant covariates. The findings from this study suggest that Reservists and National Guardsmen do not have significantly higher mean PTSD or depression severity scores nor increased odds of screening positive for PTSD or depression compared with active-duty members over approximately 6 years of follow-up.
Hearing Loss Associated with US Military Combat Deployment Noise and Health 2015 Jan-Feb; 74(17): 34-42

Wells TS, Seelig AD, Ryan MAK, Jones JM, Hooper TI, Jacobson IG, Boyko EJ

This study investigated hearing loss among Service members and Veterans. New-onset hearing loss was associated with combat deployment. Among those who had deployed, new-onset hearing loss was also associated with proximity to improvised explosive devices and experiencing a combat-related head injury. These findings have implications for health care and disability planning, as well as for prevention programs.

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