Publications

The following manuscripts have been published or are currently in press. Listings are in chronological order, unless otherwise noted.

Research Publication 2
Title Publication Date/Location
Cervical cancer screening compliance among active duty service members in the US military Preventive Medicine Reports 2022 Apr; 26: 101746

Seay J, Matsuno RK, Porter B, Tannenbaum K, Warner S, Wells N

Previous research suggests active duty service members (ADSM) experience higher rates of human papilloma virus infection and cervical dysplasia, which puts them at greater risk for cervical cancer. The current study examined crude rates and correlates of cervical cancer screening compliance in 2003–2015 among screening-eligible ADSM in the Millennium Cohort Study (MCS). Most participants were 21–29 years old (79.4%), non-Hispanic White (60.6%), and enlisted (82.2%). Crude rates of cervical cancer screening compliance increased from 2003 (61.2%) to 2010 (83.1%), and then declined in 2015 (59.8%). Older ADSM and those who had a history of deployment had lower odds of screening compliance. ADSM in the Air Force and those in healthcare occupations had higher odds of screening compliance. Study findings suggest that cervical cancer screening compliance is declining among ADSM. Interventions to improve screening should target groups with lower screening compliance.

View full text

Challenges of Self-Reported Medical Conditions and Electronic Medical Records Among Members of a Large Military Cohort BMC Medical Research Methodology 2008 Jun;8:37

Smith B, Chu LK, Smith TC, Amoroso PJ, Boyko EJ, Hooper TI, Gackstetter GD, Ryan MAK, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

This report highlights the importance of assessing medical conditions from multiple electronic and self-reported sources.

View abstract

Changes in Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines After Discharge from the Military Journal of Physical Activity Health 2015 May;12(5):666-674

Littman AJ, Jacobson IG, Boyko EJ, Smith TC

Using data from Millennium Cohort Study participants, we investigated changes in meeting federal Physical Activity Guidelines for moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA) following military discharge. MVPA declined more in those who were discharged than those who were not (-17.8 percentage points vs. -2.7 percentage points), with greater declines in former active-duty personnel, those who had deployed with combat exposures, had 14-25 years of service, and had been discharged more recently (<1 year prior). Reductions in MVPA were substantial and unexpected. Increased understanding of transitional periods that may benefit from interventions to mitigate declines in physical activity will help prevent excess weight gain and physical inactivity-associated health consequences.

View abstract

Chronic Multisymptom Illness: A Comparison of Iraq and Afghanistan Deployers with 1991 Gulf War Veterans American Journal of Epidemiology 2014;180(12):1176-1187

Smith TC, Powell TM, Jacobson IG, Smith B, Hooper TI, Boyko EJ, Gackstetter GD

These data highlight a difference in CMI reporting when comparing deployed to non-deployed military members. While symptom reporting in this contemporary Cohort occurred less frequently than in the historical 1991 GW cohort, increased CMI reporting was noted among deployed compared to non-deployed contemporary Cohort members.

View full text

Cigarette Smoking and Military Deployment: A Prospective Evaluation American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2008 Dec;35(6):539-46

Smith B, Ryan MAK, Wingard DL, Patterson TL, Slymen DJ, Macera CA, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Findings suggest an increase in smoking initiation and recidivism among deployers and highlight the importance of prevention strategies pre, during, and post deployment.

View full text

Cigarette smoking patterns among U.S. military service members before and after separation from the military PLoS One 2021 Oct 4;16(10):e0257539

Nieh C, Mancuso JD, Powell TM, Welsh MM, Gackstetter GD, Hooper TI.

Millennium Cohort Study data were used to examine smoking behavior at enrollment into the study and through their first follow-up survey, approximately 3 years later. Time remaining in service from baseline until separation or the first follow-up survey was the main exposure of interest. The baseline prevalence of smoking in the Cohort was higher among those who eventually separated (20.1%) than among those who remained on active service (17.4%), but the overall prevalence of current smokers significantly declined over the observation period. Factors significantly associated with greater likelihood of smoking at follow- up were baseline smoking, non-White Hispanic individuals, being non-married, enlisted rank, underweight or healthy BMI, active duty component, any alcohol consumption, experiencing two or more stressful life events, and screening positive for either PTSD or depression. Including smoking prevention and/or cessation programs in pre-separation counseling sessions and developing smoking screening and cessation programs targeting high-risk subgroups may reduce smoking among Service members and veterans.

View full text

Combat and Trajectories of Physical Health Functioning in U.S. Service Members American Journal of Preventative Medicine 2019 Nov;57(5):637-644

Porter B, Bonanno GA, Bliese PD, Phillips CJ, Proctor SP for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Combat is detrimental to long-term physical health functioning among deployed service members, but other pre-deployment modifiable factors like body size and smoking status had stronger associations with subsequent trajectories. This indicates the negative impact of combat may be mitigated through pre-deployment healthy behaviors.

View full text

Combat Deployment is Associated with Sexual Harassment or Sexual Assault in a Large, Female Military Cohort Women's Health Issues 2013 Jul-Aug;23(4):e215-23

LeardMann CA, Pietrucha A, Magruder KM, Smith B, Murdoch M, Jacobson IG, Ryan MAK, Gackstetter G, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Among female service members, the 3-year cumulative incidence of sexual harassment was 9.4% and sexual assault was 2.1%. Significant risk factors for sexual trauma included prior deployment with combat experience, serving as a Marine, younger age, recent marital separation or divorce, positive screen for a prior mental health condition, moderate/severe life stress, and prior sexual trauma experiences. Understanding the factors associated with sexual harassment and assault can inform future policy and prevention efforts in order to eliminate sexual trauma.

View full text

Combat Experience, New-Onset Mental Health Conditions, and Posttraumatic Growth in U.S. Service Members Psychiatry Fall 2021;84(3):276-290

Jacobson IG, Adler AB, Roenfeldt KA, Porter,B., LeardMann CA, Rull RP, Hoge CW

Research on posttraumatic growth (PTG) after traumatic experiences has raised questions on measurement, validity, and clinical utility. We longitudinally examined PTG among Millennium Cohort Study deployers (n=8,732), who screened negative for PTSD and depression at time 1, using a measure that improved upon previous psychometric issues. A strong inverse correlation was found between PTG scores at time 2 and new onset mental health problems (PTSD, depression), where lower growth scores correlated with worse mental health (i.e. higher PTSD or depression screening scores). Only 5% of participants who screened positive for a mental health problem at time 2 experienced positive growth. Results suggest that measurement of PTG is not independent from mental health problems following combat experiences and thus challenge the clinical utility of the PTG construct.

View full text

Combat exposure and behavioral health in U.S. Army Special Forces PLoS One 2022 Jun 28;17(6):e0270515

Rivera AC, LeardMann CA, Rull RP, Cooper A, Warner S, Faix D, Deagle E, Neff R, Caserta R, Adler AB, Millennium Cohort Study Team

In this cross-sectional study using Millennium Cohort Study data, various types of combat, such as combat severity, fighting, threat to oneself, and killing noncombatants, were consistently associated with mental health disorders, trouble sleeping, and problem drinking among all three Army occupational specialization investigated (General Purpose Forces infantrymen, Ranger Qualified infantrymen, and Special Forces personnel). However, with few exceptions, Special Forces personnel and Ranger Qualified infantrymen had lower prevalence of these adverse outcomes. Findings suggest that even elite personnel may be negatively impacted by experiencing combat, thus trainings and interventions focused on moral conflict reasoning and resolution may help to mitigate some of these adverse behavioral outcomes.

View full text

The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense of non-U.S. Government sites or the information, products, or services contained therein. Although the Department of Defense may or may not use these sites as additional distribution channels for Department of Defense information, it does not exercise editorial control over all of the information that you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this website.

Publication badge scores are provided by Altmetric.