Publications

The following manuscripts have been published or are currently in press. Listings are in chronological order, unless otherwise noted.

Research Publication 2
Title Publication Date/Location
Assessing Nonresponse Bias at Follow-Up in a Large Prospective Cohort of Relatively Young and Mobile Military Service Members BMC Medical Research Methodology 2010 Oct;10(1):99

Littman AJ, Boyko EJ, Jacobson IG, Horton JL, Gackstetter GD, Smith B, Hooper TI, Amoroso PJ, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

In this study population, nonresponse to the follow-up questionnaire did not result in appreciable bias as reflected by comparing measures of association for selected outcomes using complete case and inverse probability weighted methods.

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Application of Latent Semantic Analysis for Open-Ended Responses in a Large, Epidemiologic Study BMC Medical Research Methodology 2011 Oct;11:136

Leleu TD, Jacobson IG, LeardMann CA, Smith B, Foltz PW, Amoroso PJ, Derr M, Ryan MAK, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Using latent semantic analysis to analyze the final open-ended text field on the Millennium Cohort questionnaire helped identify important topic areas for future survey questions and also revealed the most common areas of concern for participants were illness and injuries, exposures, and exercise. Subjects with worse self-reported general health were more likely to provide a response in the open-ended text field than subjects with better general health.

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Anthrax Vaccination in the Millennium Cohort: Validation and Measures of Health American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2007 Apr;32(4):347-53

Smith B, Leard CA, Smith TC, Reed RJ, Ryan MAK, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

The largest ever evaluation of this topic revealed strong validity of self-reported vaccination, as well as unique health features of the small subset who may misreport vaccination. This work won awards at two research conferences in 2006.

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Alcohol Use and Alcohol-Related Problems Before and After Military Combat Deployment Journal of the American Medical Association 2008 Aug;300(6):663-75

Jacobson IG, Ryan MAK, Hooper TI, Smith TC, Amoroso PJ, Boyko EJ, Gackstetter GD, Wells TS, Bell NS, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Findings suggest that Reserve and National Guard personnel and younger service members who deploy with reported combat exposures are at increased risk of new-onset heavy weekly drinking, binge drinking, and other alcohol-related problems.

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A Prospective Study of Lupus and Rheumatoid Arthritis in Relation to Deployment in Support of Iraq and Afghanistan: the Millennium Cohort Study Autoimmune Diseases 2011 Nov;741267

Jones KA, Granado NS, Smith B, Slymen DJ, Ryan MAK, Boyko EJ, Gackstetter GD, Phillips CJ, Smith TC, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Newly reported lupus was not associated with military deployment in support of the current operations in Iraq and Afghanistan when compared with nondeployers. Our study did note a significantly decreased risk of newly reported rheumatoid arthritis among deployers with and without combat exposures when compared with nondeployers; the reason for this finding is unknown, but may be due to a selection effect for deployment.

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A Prospective Study of Depression Following Combat Deployment in Support of the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan American Journal of Public Health 2010 Jan;100(1):90-9

Wells TS, LeardMann CA, Fortuna SO, Smith B, Smith TC, Ryan MAK, Boyko EJ, Blazer D, for the Millennium Cohort Study Team

Findings emphasize that exposure to combat, rather than deployment itself, among men and women significantly increase the risk of new-onset depression.

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A Longitudinal Investigation of Smoking Initiation and Relapse Among Younger and Older US Military Personnel American Journal of Public Health 2015 Jun;105(6):1220-1229

Boyko EJ, Trone DW, Peterson AV, Jacobson IG, Littman AJ, Maynard C, Seelig AD, Crum-Cianflone NF, Bricker JB

Smoking initiation and relapse were examined among current and former military Service members. Deployment with combat experience predicted higher initiation and relapse rates. Additionally, depending on the panel, prior mental health disorders, life stressors, and other military and nonmilitary characteristics independently predicted initiation and relapse.

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A Longitudinal Comparison of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression Among Military Service Components Military Psychology 2014;26(2): 77–87

Schaller EK, Woodall KA, Lemus H, Proctor SP, Russell DW, Crum-Cianflone NF

This study investigated PTSD and depression between Reserve, National Guard and active duty continuously and dichotomously, while adjusting for deployment-related characteristics and other relevant covariates. The findings from this study suggest that Reservists and National Guardsmen do not have significantly higher mean PTSD or depression severity scores nor increased odds of screening positive for PTSD or depression compared with active-duty members over approximately 6 years of follow-up.
A Decade of War: Prospective Trajectories of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Among Deployed US Military Personnel and the Influence of Combat Exposure Reply American Journal of Epidemiology 2018 May 4;187(7):1570-1575

Donoho CJ, Bonanno GA, Porter B, Kearney L, and Powell TM

Details the reasons that the results found in "A decade of war: Prospective trajectories of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms among deployed US military personnel and the influence of combat exposure" are not likely to be confounded by mefloquine side effects.

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A Decade of War: Prospective Trajectories of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Among Deployed US Military Personnel and the Influence of Combat Exposure American Journal of Epidemiology 15 December 2017;186(12):1310–1318.

Donoho CJ, Bonanno GA, Porter B, Kearney L, Powell TM

Using survey data collected at four different time points over a 10-year study period, four distinct patterns of PTSD symptoms were observed among deployed personnel. More than 85% of participants were found to be resilient with almost no PTSD symptoms. Despite similarity in pre-deployment symptoms, those experiencing combat-related trauma had higher PTSD symptom levels following deployment across every trajectory compared with those not exposed to combat-related trauma. These findings suggest the clinical course of PTSD symptoms has a heterogeneous pattern of development, but that combat exposure is uniformly associated with poorer mental health.

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